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<   2007年 12月 ( 31 )   > この月の画像一覧
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (19)
At Winnipeg, I'd already decided to go to a Japanese restaurant that the Grand Rapids' Korean guy recommended. Having brought the sliced Walleye, however, the owner chef refused to cook it for he was very busy for Saturday. His Sushi was really good but that's all. Walking back to the hostel in the dark, a stranger begged me money obstinately. Unwillingly handed to some extent, he claimed it was too short for him and his wife and threw away the notes and coins around. I re-started walking my way without looking back on. He did the same way. After a while, I threw away the Walleye on the green aside. What a hell town!
Indeed, Winnipeg looked like a gangsters' town in desert. At the hostel, a woman pointed at me and said, "Eskimo!" The hostel's persons are somewhat out of delicacies. Anyhow, I was frustrated and had another Japanese restaurant. It was run and cooked by Vietnamese. When I said to the young owner chef that I came here because I couldn't be satisfied with a Japanese restaurant, he wanted me to tell him what was wrong. Such a sincere attitude was the very thing Japanese people now lost and wanting not only in food area but also in every area. The confidence with their products deprived them from humble humanities.
The next stop for me was Steinbach, Manitoba, where was famous for its Mennonite community. Mennonite is a sect of Christianity originated in Europe in 14th century. Its movement had included Netherlands, Germany and East Europe and moved to North America. I ate a traditional lunch, Vereniki (perogy), Farmer Sausage and Cabbage Borscht Soup, which was also common at home now; their culture appeared the mixture between Northeast and Northwest Europe. Other than very religious as a rule to go to church every Sunday, they are quite ordinary farmers, teachers and Businesspersons. In short, they are doing their jobs according to the leads of God. At least, in my opinion, their lives of simplicity and fortitude are apart from bad aspects of Christianity which Indian people pointed out.
Highway 1 from around Winnipeg to the border to Ontario should be one of the most boring section of it. From the short woods around the soil covered the paved road made my car subtly shook. Nothing above it and nothing below it on the driving.

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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-31 08:23 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (18)
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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-30 07:27 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (17)
Well, still I was interested in how the European immigrants influenced this country. So I took my route to Gimli at the coast of Lake Winnipeg. It is said to be pioneered by Icelanders; however, here again it was so organised and established as tourist business that I was re-aware that Canada is taking care of every bit of its soil for sightseeing. Such as if amusement park is nothing but commonplace for me.
However, I was really impressed by the Icelander descendants' strong connections to their home country, which was shown on the exhibition of Iceland's ecological energy systems. Another thing I found was that Canadian people are really moving about this country; at the bar of my motel, I met a guy who was fisherman from Vancouver. According to him, the fish he could catch in Vancouver were so decreased that he came here to continue his business; it didn't matter whether it is on the sea or the lake provided that he could catch from a boat. I am afraid, however, I don't want to eat any fish caught in this contaminated lake.

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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-29 07:14 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (16)
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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-28 06:08 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (15)
I strolled around the Reserve with a camera. The atmosphere was more common than that of the Pelican Narrow. Focusing on a magnificent sunset, I accosted the group who were chatting on a veranda with can beers. They seemed to be neighbours. I asked about Grand Rapids where before the dam was built people had difficulty to cross the narrows.
Their ancestors used to be fishermen; however, after the construction of the dam in '60s the amount of fish has significantly decreased and water became dirty. Here, too, I heard that the water used to be edible. Cedar Lake where I fished has mouthes flowed from Saskatchewan where there are several factories as I observed in Creighton. However, they didn't speak ill of the dam and the environmental pollution.
When I started walking away from them, a bared man called me with gesture to turn back. He offered me a Moose Soup. After finishing their supper, they were resting maybe. Wow, what a lucky! Surprisingly, it had no stimulus and natural itself. Probably the oil came from Moose's subcutaneous fat but mild. "How did you keep your culture? Do you speak Cree?" Quite different from Saskatchewan's Cree I met, they actually couldn't. Until recently there was a teacher to teach Cree in the school, but after her leaving there have been no system to succeed their culture! Focusing on a young woman who spoke this, I saw the same hesitation in her as old Japanese showed when taken pictures. However, she as well as another guy looked mixed with some White blood.

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I met another Indian, an Ojibway, on the way to Winnipeg. As I mentioned the Walleye I caught in Cedar Lake was a bit smelled and suspected the influence of pollution, he agreed saying that Walleye in the old days tasted more sweet and were more beautiful but that now are soon floated up without any resistances. Probably because he had no interest in governmental organisations like the people I met in Grand Rapids, he was more straight forward to the loss of their aboriginal culture. He definitely pointed out that the wrong points of White people to cope with aboriginal should be attributed to Churches. They have been always right and always pussy about their justice on another people and another continent.

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by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-27 06:17 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (14)
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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-26 08:42 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (13)
Finding terrible smokes of the mining industry in such a countryside as Creighton, which is located on the border between Saskatchewan and Manitoba, I wondered if Canada was only utilising this Nature in greedy ways.
Just after the Flin Flon, I asked for fishing information and purchased the licence of Manitoba and lures. The outfitter lady told me several off-shore points near there, though she strongly recommended me to hire an airplane to fly to points. No way, such a selfish way, I spoke to myself in mind.
Since the engine got a strange noise with Shell Bronze and after that I saw Esso's pumping-up site, I kept filling up Esso as much as possible. As I found an Esso station after a long drive, I stopped to fill up both gas for car and food for me. It was a lonely shop on the highway.
Inside of the old building was a young Korean guy. I was very surprised and felt why a Korean was at such an interior of Canada. Wow, the restaurant was also with Korean women. They didn't go with the old Canadian style restaurant. I ordered a hamburger, soup and coffee; it was cold with half-sleeves outside even though it was still August.
Soon, an old slim Korean guy appeared and accosted me. That was Mr John T.M. Bae. He sat in front of me and wanted to speak with me with a sharp look. He recommended me to help myself to another coffee. His English was not good but he could understand Japanese and write Japanese letters. We communicated a lot in writing on napkins.
Mr Bae just sold his business of this general store to a Korean family and was about to move to Vancouver. He was also the Vice Mayer of here Grand Rapids. He eked money living here over 10 years and brought up children until graduating from universities. However, the moving didn't mean his retirement; he wanted another business opportunity for 2010 Winter Olympics of Vancouver, the rapid growing area. While our talking, a White man gave him a greetings and they held each other. They didn't speak too much.
Mr Bae mentioned his hardships as immigrant. He graduated from one of the top rated law-school college in Korea, but it was no use in Canada. According to him, why the education industry in Canada has developed is because immigrants need Canadian education to get a position in Canadian society system. This domestic system, however, prevents Canadian industries from breaking through an average level and from nurturing unique entrepreneurs; consequently, only followers multiply.
From my experience, at least UBC was pursuing the path of study's study sake. Such a theoretical and academic education system shouldn't work in a real society. However, all of the Canadians take it for granted to follow that way; this is the basic problem of Canada.
I asked to Mr Bae if there was a good off-shore fishing point near there, since the Grand Rapids was the narrow between Lake Winnipeg and Cedar Lake. He grinned; he was also a fisherman! He immediately brought me to his home-ground. He told me how to fish in detail. The lure was just the same as in Pelican Narrows; however, he also set a frozen minnow. "This is a home for Walleye and Pike," he said. Having got his teach, I learned the way I tried at Pelican Narrows was wrong in that I had to tell their subtle signal and wait a while.
I wanted to take pictures of him not only as my master of fishing but also as a self-succeeded immigrant. But he refused, saying, "I'm not very special. There are a lot of succeeded immigrants like me." His rod was very slender to enjoy the fights, and it bent down with bite. He beard with its heavy weight for a while; after that, a Walleye appeared beneath the half-cleared green surface. Ohhh, huge! After floting, it wasn't violent so much. He asked if I wanted to keep it. It looked around 60 cm, and I wanted it for my dinner.
The spot was a tiny concrete dyke and two fishermen was the full capacity on it. Ironically, an artificial construction by human beings invited fish to live there. He got another bite, but the moment hooking up the line got cut. "Must be Pike," he said. "Why don't you use wire lead?" "I know, but it's not interesting to use a safe way." He changed his colour in a moment, but a bite seemed to go away from him. He returned the store with remained minnows for me.
Then I tried to follow the way Mr Bae did by myself. While repeating casts, a weight feeling came on the tip of my rod. I breathed deeply and slowly and hooked up! Got it! Wooow, he is so violent. The line was getting out of the spool, I tried to keep vertical for my rod. Probably this much weight was for the first time in my off-shore fishing life. After a while, I confirmed it was a bit smaller than the one Mr Bae caught.
I had noticed a car once approached behind me and left. When my leaving, probably the same car came and two men accosted me getting out of it. I couldn't tell immediately what they said; however, I explained Mr Bae brought me here. "Yes, he know a lot of this area," replied a man and gave me a brand-new cap. He said he was working for Manitoba Transportation and Government Services (The roads construction sector) and that was its cap. He was fishing around with his works!
They went into the spot I left.
Reported my result to Mr Bae, he gave me a cook for me to just try. His way of cutting fish was dynamic far from Japanese way. He disposed great part of the fish but took out the cheek meet. "That's the way of Canada," he said, "but until recently I didn't know the cheek is very good." He made me a fish and chips in the kitchen of the restaurant. The taste of the white meet of Walleye was very plain just like as Sea Bass as the similar shape was shown, but I didn't think it is very tasty for its plainness and also for its a little bit smell. However, Mr Bae said Walleye is high-rated in the fish market in Canada.
On the table, I asked about the Indian reserves nearby. In this area is also Cree, he said. "If are there any Metis people?" "No, Metis as well as other ethnic groups are not allowed in the First Nations." I wondered why I observed not a few White people in there so far. Anyway, he not only gave me a cooler-box to keep the rest of fish meat but also brought me to a nice cabin nearby.

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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-25 08:50 | 13.Manitoba
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (12)
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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-24 08:43 | 12.Saskatchewan
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (11)
At last I could get no fish over two days. When a White guy fished next to next saying, "Hey, fishing time has just began," from the spot I just left, I really got frustrated. However, instead of fish I met a nicest people in the village.
In front of the band office was a traditional Tepee for a man who were resisting Westernised houses. He wanted me to take pictures with a woman who was not allowed house by the band because she was Catholic. Finding me with cameras, the families out of home asked me for taking pictures of them. Children were playing with families together. Among them somewhat a White father was found. His Indian wife invited me to their traditional dinner. The kids were amusing themselves with Nature. Some girls called me as Chinese, so I replied, "No, Japanese." Some boys asked me if I was lonely travelling alone without family. His question reminded me that no matter where you may go you will think of your family. I thought that children are to the world what leaves are to the forest.
I asked to some adults outside the home after supper why there were two churches in such a small village. "I don't know, but that one with red roof is an Anglican recently built. People here merely go to churches though." "Is the community changed with Withe people?" "Yes, a lot. Before they came, you could drink the water of the lake. They only think of money. The churches are irrelevant to us."
My perception of Canada as multi-cultural country gradually began to change as still keeping pressing British notion much like missionary age. The industrialisation and christianisation seemed like a set of tools for Western people.

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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-23 07:58 | 12.Saskatchewan
Over 30,000 km it was Canada everywhere (10)
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[PR]
by tetsu95jp | 2007-12-22 07:56 | 12.Saskatchewan
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